NameAbstractAvailability
NEM 2016. Paper on Opportunities for Object Based Broadcasting Abstract: About 15% of the TV hours watched in UK homes is brought into people’s homes using Internet protocols and about 85% of the data carried by the Internet to people’s homes is video. As the worlds of the Internet and video and television continue to converge this paper explores the impact of treating TV content more like web content. In particular it examines, through a use case based on the delivery of filmed theatre, the proposed benefits to end users of adopting an object-oriented approach to broadcasting.Download PDF
TVX Demonstration Description: "A Platform for Orchestrated Multi-Screen Entertainment"Abstract: This demonstration showcases a new approach to the production and delivery of multi-screen entertainment enabled by an innovative, standards-based platform developed by the EU-funded project 2-IMMERSE. Object-based production enables engaging and interactive experiences which make optimal use of the devices available, while maintaining the look and feel of a single application. The ‘Theatre at Home’ prototype offers an enhanced social experience for users watching a live or ‘as live’ broadcast of a theatre performance, allowing them to discuss it with others who are watching at the same time, either in a different room or in a different home.Download PDF
"Multi-Screen Director: a New Role in the TV Production Workflow?"Authored by B. Meixner, M. Glancy, M. Rogers, C. Ward, T. Roggla, and P. Cesar
Abstract: Multi-screen applications have been a research topic for the last 10 years. Recent technical advances make authoring and broadcasting of interactive multi-platform experiences possible. However, most of the efforts have been dedicated to the delivery and transmission technology (e.g., HbbTV2.0), but not to the production process. The hypothesis of this paper is that studio and outside broadcast production requires radical changes in the production workflow, in order to allow for an efficient management of interactive multi-platform experiences. This paper explores such changes, investigating workflows and roles, and identifying key requirements for supporting these. The final objective is to create a new set of tools, which are extending current processes, that allow broadcasters to curate new types of experiences. We conducted a set of interviews with broadcast producers and directors that allowed us to identify two major (sub-)workflows, one for pre-recorded and one for live experiences. We could then assign roles to the different stages of the workflows and derive a number of requirements for the next generation of production tools.
In Adjunct Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for Television and Online Video, (ACM TVX 2017), Hilversum, The Netherlands, June 14-16, 2017.
“Interaction Design for Online Video and Television"Authored by P. Cesar, and M. Obrist
Abstract: This course teaches attendees how to design and evaluate interaction with online video and television. It provides attendees a pragmatic toolset, including techniques and guidelines, which can be directly applied in practice. The different tools will be contextualized based on current developments, giving participants a complete overview of the state of the art and industry.
In the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016
"Social Interaction Design for Online Video and Television"Authored by P. Cesar and D. Geerts
Abstract: Several years ago, first conceptualizations of the usages of the secondary screen in the television environment were proposed. At the time, the real challenge was to convince stakeholders that interactivity was not a threat, but an opportunity. Ten years later, the mass adoption of smaller devices has reshaped the media landscape, truly enabling interactivity while consuming media content at home. What was perceived as hindering the user experience - the second screen - has resulted into an essential companion to the television. Paradoxically, even though key players are investing on secondary screen applications, there are very few successful examples. In this talk we provide an overview of the present state of the art through representative examples and discuss future possibilities and challenges. In particular, we will focus on the importance of immersion, taking into account the surrounding of the users, and of sociability, involving her social network. The talk will conclude by highlighting the importance of storytelling for crafting experiences that take advantage of the new media landscape, and the still relevant work of professionals that master such a craft.
In R. Nakatsu, M. Rauterberg, and P. Ciancarini (eds.), Handbook of Digital Games and Entertainment Technologies, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag (2016).
"From Secondary Screens to Socially-Aware and Immersive Experiences"Authored by P. Cesar.
Abstract: Several years ago, first conceptualizations of the usages of the secondary screen in the television environment were proposed. At the time, the real challenge was to convince stakeholders that interactivity was not a threat, but an opportunity. Ten years later, the mass adoption of smaller devices has reshaped the media landscape, truly enabling interactivity while consuming media content at home. What was perceived as hindering the user experience - the second screen - has resulted into an essential companion to the television. Paradoxically, even though key players are investing on secondary screen applications, there are very few successful examples. In this talk we provide an overview of the present state of the art through representative examples and discuss future possibilities and challenges. In particular, we focus on the importance of immersion, taking into account the surrounding of the users, and of sociability, involving her social network. The talk concludes by highlighting the importance of storytelling for crafting experiences that take advantage of the new media landscape, and the still relevant work of professionals that master such a craft.
In Applications and Usability of Interactive TV, (revised selected papers from CTVDI 2015), 2016, pp. VII – VIII.
More here
“On Time or Not on Time: A User Study on Delays in a Synchronised Companion-Screen Experience”Authored by C. Ziegler, C. Keimel, R. Ramdhany, V. Vinayagamoorthy.
Abstract: The paper presents results of a user study. The study evaluated the potential influence of different delays, between the TV and the companion screen, on how users experience watching a Shakespearean play on the TV, using a synchronised, interactive textbook application on the companion screen.

The paper was awarded the TVX ’17 conference’s BEST PAPER AWARD.
Available here.
"2-IMMERSE: A Platform for Orchestrated Multi-Screen Entertainment"Authored by: I. Kegel, J. Walker, M.Lomas, J. Jansen, J.Wyver
Abstract: This demonstration showcases a new approach to the production and delivery of multi-screen entertainment enabled by an innovative, standards-based platform developed by the EU-funded project 2-IMMERSE. Object-based production enables engaging and interactive experiences which make optimal use of the devices available, while maintaining the look and feel of a single application. The ‘Theatre at Home’ prototype offers an enhanced social experience for users watching a live or ‘as live’ broadcast of a theatre performance, allowing them to discuss it with others who are watching at the same time, either in a different room or in a different home.
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